‘It was a really long journey’: COVID firefighters recover over long distances

The 14-year-old veteran of the Sacramento Fire Department is still recovering from the long-term effects of contracting COVID-19. “It was a really long journey,” said firefighter Matt Rogge, 41, describing what he experienced shortly after he was diagnosed with Coronavirus in July. “I had a fever. The temperature was 103 for two days and then it dropped to 100, 101 for four or five days after that … severe body aches, nausea. I couldn’t eat anything. I couldn’t hold anything … I ended up. Losing about 25 pounds in two weeks. ”Roger went on to describe that he felt very exhausted as he began to recover.“ I tried to go out and walk to the front yard, I took all I had, he said. Roger had to take a month and a half off work. When he got back into full service. In mid-August, he said his strength and conditioning are not the same as they were in the previous days of COVID. “Everything takes a lot of effort,” said Rogge who has struggled with those lingering effects of the virus ever since. Ed Carretto, Occupational Medicine Doctor at Dignity Health System, referred To the Mercy General’s Pulmonary Rehabilitation Center where he works with a respiratory therapist – often full-dressed for firefighting and climbing stairs to mimic his counterpart on working conditions. “Knowing it would be a long way back to my full strength was difficult,” he said. He is not the only member of the department to have contracted COVID-19 nor is he the only one who has lived longer – a Its long-term eruption – weeks or even months after diagnosis. “It’s non-discriminatory and it doesn’t matter who you are and where you come from,” said Greg Powell, a battalion chief for the Sacramento Fire Department. “In our state,“ long-distance carriers. ”There is a subdivision of people who contract COVID and it has long-term effects.” Powell said a lot of times “long-distance carriers” still have difficulty breathing or exhaust themselves. “They can walk around. But when they start moving at a faster pace or what we call “ground speed,” it affects them as they become short of breath, dizzy, and light-headed, and it affects their ability to function. ”Powell said that could be a fact that is difficult to accept for people in this Working line. “We do this mission because we love it. He explained that we do this mission because we love to help people, which is why Roger uses his expertise in fighting the Coronavirus to reach others.” I wear all my equipment to protect myself, especially when entering a fire or any dangerous environment, ”he said. It takes a lot of effort to wear this gear, and just wearing a mask is something that does not take much effort at all. “Protecting ourselves from the unknown about COVID is easy, but this can make a difference to our health or the health of loved ones.” It’s a roll of dice. To find out what will happen to you when you catch the virus, ”Rogge said.“ The best thing we can do is wear a mask, wash our hands, and follow all instructions to protect yourself from it so that you don’t have to take this opportunity. ”

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The 14-year-old veteran of the Sacramento Fire Department is still recovering from the long-term effects of contracting COVID-19.

“It was a really long journey,” said firefighter Matt Rogge, 41, describing what he went through shortly after he was diagnosed with the Coronavirus in July.

“I got a fever. It was 103 for a few days and then it dropped to 100, 101 for four or five days after that … severe body aches, nausea. I couldn’t eat anything. I couldn’t bear anything … I ended up losing About 25 pounds in two weeks. “

Roger went on to describe that he felt very tired as he began to recover. “I tried to go out and walk to the front yard,” he said. “I took everything I had.”

Rog had to take a month and a half off work. When he returned to full service in mid-August, he said his strength and conditioning are not the same as his pre-COVID days.

“Everything takes a lot of effort,” said Rogge, who has fought the lingering effects of the virus ever since.

Rouge physician, David Carretto, an occupational medicine physician at the Dignity Health System, referred Roger to the Mercy General’s Pulmonary Rehabilitation Center where he works with a respiratory therapist – often wearing full firefighting clothing and climbing stairs to simulate his work. Job conditions.

“It was hard to know that it would be a long way back to my full strength,” he said.

Rouge is not the only member in the department who has contracted COVID-19 nor is he the only one who has experienced long-term effects of it – weeks or even months after diagnosis.

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“It’s nondiscriminatory and it doesn’t matter who you are and where you come from,” said Greg Powell, a battalion chief for the Sacramento Fire Department. “In our state[s], Long Distance Carriers. There is a subdivision of people who contract COVID and have long-term effects. ”

All too often, Powell said, “long-distance travelers” still had difficulty breathing or exhausted themselves.

“They can walk around, but when they start moving at a faster pace or what we call” ground speed, “it affects them as they become short of breath, dizziness, and dizziness, and that affects their work ability.”

Powell said this could be a hard-to-accept fact for people in this line of work.

“We do this job because we love it. We do this job because we love to help people.”

That’s why Roger is using his expertise in fighting the Coronavirus to reach others.

He said, “I wear all my equipment to protect myself, especially entering a fire or any dangerous environment.” “It takes a lot of effort to wear that gear, and just wearing a mask is something that doesn’t take much effort at all.”

Protecting ourselves from the unknown about the emerging corona virus is easy, but it may make a difference to our health or the health of our loved ones.

“It’s a roll of dice to see what will happen to you when you catch the virus,” Rogge said. “The best thing we can do is wear a mask, wash our hands, and follow all directions to protect yourself from that. You don’t have to take this opportunity.”

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